Bigger Differences Between Regular Computers and Gaming Computers

The Gap between Gamer PCs and Regular Computers is Growing

Traditionally, the difference between your average computers and gamer PCs has always been simple: your average computer was built with nearly outdated technology and your gamer PC was built the latest and greatest components. Now as technology is taking leaps and bounds in program and game design as well as in software development and application, computer hardware has had to be improved and innovated faster than ever before. Program developers are making their most creative and exotic imaginings become virtual reality on computer hardware that is years ahead of what average desktops are normally comprised. Gamer PCs have been built to bring to life on the monitor the developers’ best renderings of their imaginations.

Innovation

In order to keep up with developers’ and players’ demands for performance, advances in hardware have grown at an alarming rate, lengthening the gap between gamer PCs and regular computers by years. One of the largest differences when looking at the latest high-end gamer PC compared to a regular system is that the latest gamer PC has liquid cooling tubes which keep the CPU and graphics cards chilled and running faster. The lack of empty space is also quite obvious; whereas, in a normal desktop there is often glaring spaces of emptiness that don’t exist in its competition.

Visual Performance

Another conspicuous dissimilarity between normal desktop computers and gaming computers is the performance when playing programs like Crisis or Skyrim. The quality of play and visual performance is astounding on computers for gamers, especially when compared with the play and visual performance on a regular desktop system. The graphics cards in the comparison above are often completely incompatible to begin with. Not to mention the CPUs running them would also be on totally separate levels in term of processing speed and power.

Speed and Price

The speed and processing power of gaming computers would normally begin near the 3.0 GHZ range. This is where you might be able to reach if you were to try and overclock the CPU on an average desktop computer. An average desktop could cost anywhere from $800-$2,000, whereas a high-end performance machine could cost upwards of $10,000-$15,000 for a cutting edge, custom built, overclocked computer.

The differences between regular computers and gamer PCs has stretched and grown in every way including dollar signs. The most obvious difference, however, is simply in performance.

Source by David I Marquez

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